Vanier News – December 23, 2012

IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK


Previous poll questions and results:

  • Does violence in video games promote violent behaviour in children? YES: 86% NO: 14%
  • Should security cameras be used at our school? YES: 89% NO: 11%

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SEASON’S GREETINGS

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POEMS FROM THE HEART – Writing by Mrs. Rempel’s Grade 5/6/7 Class
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PARENTING CORNER: 5 (Good) Ways to Make Your Kid Hate You
Author: Alden Wicker
Source

Someday, if it hasn’t already happened, you’ll hear those dreaded words from your kid–”Mom, I hate you!”

You might be cool when it happens. You might even bake your daughter a commemorative “I Hate You” cake. You might have to leave the room so you can go scream into a pillow. No matter how you think you might react, you’d better prepare yourself now, because if you’re a good parent, the big “I hate you!” moment tends to be a when, not an if.

That’s because there are several things you will do on your way to raising a smart, self-sufficient human being that, at the time, your kid won’t get. But one day, after all is said and done, your grown son or daughter will write an article for LearnVest that says, “I owe my financial habits to my mother, and I say that with pride.”

To help you in your effort to be “totally mean” and to embrace your “ruining” their lives, here are five things that you should do with your child that will make them hate you now … and totally thank you later.

1. Deny him candy at the checkout.

Ah, your child’s first impulse purchase: Reese’s. Nerds. Gummy worms. Whatever it is, when this comes up, he might not even be old enough to say “I hate you” yet, but his tantrum will make his point clear enough.

It may be hard to remember as you’re dragging him out the front door of the store while everyone stares, but as we’ve said before, impulsivity is a trait that research has definitively connected with a poor financial future. Every time you say, “that’s not how we’re spending our money,” to an impulse purchase, whether it’s candy when they’re young or sparkly jewelry when they’re teens, you’re teaching skills that will translate to being a smart shopper later on. (Here are more tips on combating impulsiveness in your child.)

2. Shoo her outside to play.

Your kid might be annoyed at having to leave the house to find entertainment, instead of stationing herself in front of the Playstation. But turning off the TV and dragging her outdoors for at least an hour a day has numerous benefits, including lowering the likelihood of ADHD, increasing performance on standardized tests, protecting her eyesight and lowering anxiety.

Plus, you’re teaching the creativity that comes with the ability to entertain oneself for free–a skill that she will highly value later on.

3. Have him do chores for spending money.

Instead of doling out the same amount of money every week for allowance, try paying your children extra for extra chores you need done around the house, like cleaning the gutters or clearing out the garage. Also encourage him to come to you with his own ideas on what he can do around the house, and how much he thinks it’s worth to you. You’ll be helping him build entrepreneurial and negotiation skills.

4. Make her take lessons, and don’t let her quit.

It’s totally unfair, but true for at least a handful of us here on the LearnVest editorial team: We regret our parents letting us quit our lessons. Moms editor Cheryl wishes her parents hadn’t let her quit violin. Senior editor Laura is mad her parents let her quit dance. In short, we each gave our parents hell for years, but we wish they had forced us to keep going.

This isn’t just because we wish we could jam out “Piano Man” at a party on a whim. Research shows that music lessons can increase children’s IQs, improve their memory and make children more sensitive to emotional cues in speech. Participating in sports can improve self confidence and–especially in girls–improve their body image. Kids who play sports also fare better in school and are less likely to smoke, do drugs or abuse alcohol in high school.

Plus, in this election season, we especially like that Michelle Obama makes her girls choose one activity and do one that she picks out for them–so they can learn to work hard at something they don’t necessarily enjoy.

If you’re looking for lessons and activities that fit your budget, use our guide. (We love Girl Scouts because it’s affordable and includes financial literacy activities.)

5. Let them flail … and fail.

We don’t recommend you check out completely–kids need your support. But at some point, be it when he hits calculus in high school, when he’s four states away in college or when he’s searching for his first job, you won’t be able to help him at all. So start letting him flail on small things now. Your kid might be supremely annoyed that you’ve declined to shell out $50 for diorama materials and instead made him get creative with what he could find in the craft box, or that you let the deadline go by for applying to join that elite sports team (when you clearly told him it was his responsibility), but you’re teaching him invaluable skills like creativity and the ability to get stuff done.

Research supports this view: One study showed that children who tried and failed to retrieve an answer before being told the correct response were more likely to remember the answer next time. Kids also perform better in school when they know that failure is part of learning. Try letting your child fail, but then brainstorming ways they can improve and succeed next time.

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LEARNING COMMON NEWS

Click here to see what’s happening in the Georges Vanier Learning Commons…

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT
Our Christmas Concert was a great success despite some minor “technical glitches”. Thank you to Mrs. Scheller and the whole of the Vanier staff for your hard work in preparing our students, and of course to our talented students for performing so well and confidently.

Both performances were videotaped and complimentary DVDs will be available early in January.

Thank you parents for your patience, support, and ticket donations. All proceeds will go towards special lighting (some of which you saw at the concert) which will be used for many years to come at concerts, assemblies, and special events.

Mrs. Scheller leads Georges Vanier students

Mrs. Scheller leads Georges Vanier students at our recent Christmas Concert

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Making Connections
We know that when student work on authentic learning tasks, they see purpose in what they are doing and are motivated to do their very best. At Vanier, we try hard to provide these opportunities and our students are responding. Mrs. Chohan’s class recently had the opportunity to participate in an activity called Mystery Skype. Students from different places in the world video-conference and take turns asking questions of each other, guessing where the other class is from. Students had a great time talking with students from Missouri. We look forward to using technology such as iPads, AppleTV, and projectors, to allow our students connect with students and experts elsewhere.

Students in Mrs. Chohan's Grade 4/5 class participate in a #mysteryskype session with students in Missouri

Students in Mrs. Chohan’s Grade 4/5 class participate in a #mysteryskype session with students in Missouri

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Mrs. Chohan passes around an iPad allowing students to answer questions asked by friends in Missouri.

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
January 7, 2013…Welcome back!
January 8 – PAC Meeting – 9 a.m. AND 6 p.m.
January 16 – Uzume Taiko fine arts performance – 10:45 a.m.
January 21 – Kindergarten Registration Begins
January 28 – Clothes on Wheels at Vanier
February 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
February 11 – Family Day Holiday – Classes not in session
March 18-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
March 29 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
April 1 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

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Let it SNOW
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Vanier News – December 15, 2012

IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK
Last week’s question: Should security cameras be used at our school? YES: 91% NO: 9%


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VANIER BAND


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CONNECTICUT TRAGEDY
We are all horrified and affected by the school shooting in Connecticut this past week and I know after the shock, our thoughts turn to our own schools and our own students/children. It is understandable that there will be some anxiety about this incident.

While the potential for such an incident taking place in our schools is very low, in response to the incident our school staff has reviewed our School Safety Alert system processes and ensured we are all up-to-date and vigilant.

Staff members have been asked to watch for student reaction and to privately offer support if needed.

As a parent/guardian, you too can help your child. It is important that you are very careful to protect preschool and elementary-aged children from exposure to news media images and stories regarding the school shooting, as well as avoid overexposure generally. Also listen and watch for signs your child may need more support.

Please feel free to contact the school if you think a counselor can assist, or if you have any questions or concerns. Ways to support your child (English) Ways to support your child (Punjabi)

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PARENTING CORNER
Video Games and Violence: What Every Parent Should Know
Author: Elisabeth Wilkins, Empowering Parents Editor
Source

Do violent video games have an effect on childhood development?
Virginia Tech Shooter Cho Seung-Hui was said to be an avid player of Counter-Strike, a popular team-based shooting game. Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris were fans of Doom and Wolfenstein 3D, referring to the games in the videos they left for police to find after the Columbine massacre. Are you worried that your child is logging too much screen time in front of violent video games?

Ann Giordano in Denver, Colorado, who limits her sons’ PlayStation time to 30 minutes a day, said, “I find that when my kids, (ages 10 and 8), are done playing video games they tend to be more aggressive with one another and sometimes just plain crabby. We do not allow any videos that are overtly violent, but even with the milder ones, they’re usually shooting ray guns or driving and crashing cars plus listening to very loud music. I’m not sure why, but these fast-paced videos seem to make them more prone to acting out when the action is done. They get aggressive with each other, and as a result, they usually overdo it, then get in trouble by hurting one another.”

Dr. Craig Anderson, a professor of psychology at Iowa State University and co-author of the new book, “Violent Video Game Effects on Children and Adolescents,” is widely regarded as one of the foremost experts on violent video games. In his research on their effects on childhood development, in one recent study he found that “it didn’t matter if the games the children played were outwardly violent. Even with cute characters and happy music, children were 40% more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior after playing.”
(Source)

“What seems to be happening, and there’s a lot of research behind this, when you consume violent media—TV, movies or video games—for a brief period of time, you have somewhere in your head a whole bunch of thoughts that have to do with agreement, called a priming effect,” said Dr. Anderson. “In this country, by the time you’re five or six, most everyone has the knowledge of how to hurt someone, of fighting or shooting. When you think about aggression, that primes a whole region of your brain and primes knowledge about aggression in general. What that does is, if you’re thinking aggressive thoughts and are then put in a situation where there’s a provocation, even a mild provocation, it increases the likelihood that you’ll regard this as somewhat more serious and intentional. You’ll then respond with an aggressive response. This sort of priming effect occurs in all sorts of research today—not just with media violence. It’s a relatively short term effect that we’ve been seeing after children play violent video games.”

Long term effects: “Think of each time you do something as another learning trial. We know that repetition of any kind of decision making or thinking strengthens that particular way of thinking. If you want to memorize a telephone number, you may repeat it four to five times while you’re dialing and then you forget it. But if you repeat that experience every day for two to three weeks, you don’t need to look it up anymore. Because of repetition it becomes a long term memory. If you think about practicing making a decision to aggress against someone, like practicing multiplication tables, it’s really the same kind of learning. In both cases repetition is important. That’s why we think long term effects come about. It basically makes or changes a person. A child who watches a lot of violent TV and plays violent video games is practicing looking at the world as a dangerous place where violence and aggression are an appropriate response, more than a child would who hasn’t had that exposure.”

Some danger signs to watch for: “If your child is getting into conflicts with other kids at school, or having difficulties with teachers, those things do become more common as children become more aggressive in general. However, those are very late warning signs. Much of the damage has already been done by that point. But if you’re seeing any of that, it’s an indicator that violent media should be restricted—but that’s a difficult issue as well and depends to some extent on age. A fifteen year old is much more difficult to deal with than a seven year old. Peers are very much in charge by the teen years but there are still things you can do in terms of discussing what the issues are. If the child already has a bunch of violent video games, discuss with them in an age-appropriate way the issue of the harmful effects of violent media, allow them to choose substitute games that aren’t violent that are now being banned in the household.”

Dr. Anderson is not against children playing video games, however. “I’m a fan of video games myself. I think they’re great teaching tools–or they can be. What they teach depends very much on the content. My kids grew up playing video games, but they didn’t play violent ones. Many of the games out there are educational. Some are not, but you still learn things from them like spatial skills, hand-eye coordination, and you get the added benefit of learning to be comfortable with computers. Still, it makes sense to set rules, regardless of whether it’s violent content or not. Limit the time. Children don’t need to be spending 15-20 hours in front of video games. Today’s kids are logging 40-50 hours a week in front of a screen, if you add TV and video together—more hours than they spend in school, and that’s not counting using the computer for homework. Kids need to be out playing with other kids and interacting with their parents, whether it’s playing board games, card games, reading, or playing baseball.”

If you’ve noticed your child exhibiting aggressive tendencies after playing video games, what is the best course of action? According to Dr. Anderson, reassuringly, “A kid who has no other risk factors for violence, and plays for an hour a day for a couple of days, he’s not going to become a school shooter. Extreme forms of violence like school shootings and kids who get into lots of fights—they occur only when there are multiple risk factors. If you look at the school shooters in Columbine, or Paducah, Kentucky or Virginia Tech, there are multiple risk factors present. Since we started thinking about media violence in the last couple years we’ve found it’s just one additional risk factor that increases the likelihood of aggressive behavior. But people without risk factors, it might increase the likelihood of them getting into a fight at school, but it’s not going to turn them into a school shooter. However, with other risk factors present, it may increase the extremity of the kind of violence they might be willing to use if provoked. Instead of just slapping and hitting, they might consider doing much more serious damage, and using rocks or sticks or a knife.

What I typically suggest to parents is that they don’t allow violent video games in their home. If and when the issue comes up, that is actually a good opportunity to talk about their values, how to resolve conflicts and disputes in a non-violent way, which are useful conversations to have with kids. In any case it’s useful to convey your values to your children that violent solutions are not appropriate. Non-violent solutions can almost always be found.”

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CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
This past week, Georges Vanier was visited by two special guests. Brian and Gayle Holden are local retired educators who every year, make a difference to schools and children. This year, Brian and Gayle decided to give our school a very generous financial gift.

Thank you Brian and Gayle for your generous spirit, and for making a difference in the lives of some of our families!
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LEARNING COMMON NEWS
Amanda Prade shares her Grade One successes with Stage Stories. Students are encouraged to create and act out their written work. This week the stories were performed in the Georges Vanier Learning Commons. The stories were recorded on an iPad and students enjoyed watching their creations on the big screen.

Check out what’s been happening in the Learning Commons!

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT
Mrs. Scheller is working hard to prepare our students for the upcoming Christmas concerts. Concerts take place on Wednesday, December 19. There will be two shows: 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM. Information about purchasing tickets will come home this coming Monday, December 10. General Admission tickets are available for a $2 donation while special $5 tickets will be available that will be put you into a draw for upgraded FRONT ROW couch seating.
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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Writing for a REAL audience
We know that when student work on authentic learning tasks, they see purpose in what they are doing and are motivated to do their very best. At Vanier, we try hard to provide these opportunities and our students are responding. An important aspect of authentic learning is ensuring our students have an authentic AUDIENCE to share their learning with. That’s why many of our students are “blogging” – writing online, sharing their writing with others, and accepting feedback from people at other schools and around the world. To ensure privacy and student security, students learn not to share personal information and all comments are moderated by teachers before being posted on websites.
This past December 12 was a special calendar day – it was 12/12/12 day. So students decided to write “TOP 12” blogs. Enjoy JESSLYN and BLEA’s blog here!

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
December 19-Winter concerts at 1 and 6:30 p.m.
December 21-Christmas Dances – Last day of school before holidays
January 7, 2013…Welcome back!
January 8 – PAC Meeting – 9 a.m. AND 6 p.m.
January 21 – Kindergarten Registration Begins
January 28 – Clothes on Wheels at Vanier
February 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
February 11 – Family Day Holiday – Classes not in session
March 18-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
March 29 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
April 1 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

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Vanier News – December 8, 2012

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POLL QUESTION of the Week

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Not a Parking Spot
Parents, please help us by using designated parking spots and not parking in the DROP OFF zone. You may park on the side of the road around the school, in the angled parking on 70A Avenue, or in the NORTH parking lot. Thank you for your cooperation.
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All I want for Christmas
It’s an exciting time in Kindergarten. Not only is it nearing Christmas, but our young learners are learning about letters, sounds, and how to use writing to communicate. So what do our Kindergarten students in Mrs. Pulvers’ want for Christmas?

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BATMAN!

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A VIDEO GAME!

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A POLICE RACER!

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A NINTENDO 3DS…A RED ONE!

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Learning about COMMUNITIES – Contributed by Division 16 teacher, Amanda Prade

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Learning Commons News

Check out what’s been happening in the Learning Commons!

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REPORT CARDS
Report cards will be coming home on Tuesday, December 11. Parent teacher conferences take place on Thursday, December 13. On this day, there is an early dismissal at 1:27 PM. Please take this opportunity to discuss your child’s progress with their teacher. Please phone the office to make an appointment. 604-596-1030. Here is some valuable information that will help you make the most of your meeting. Click here for this information in Punjabi.

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT
Mrs. Scheller is working hard to prepare our students for the upcoming Christmas concerts. Concerts take place on Wednesday, December 19. There will be two shows: 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM. Information about purchasing tickets will come home this coming Monday, December 10. General Admission tickets are available for a $2 donation while special $5 tickets will be available that will be put you into a draw for upgraded FRONT ROW couch seating.
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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: POWERPLAY STRATEGIES SHOW.
The Young Entrepreneurs Powerplay Strategies Show was a great success at Georges Vanier on Friday, December 7th. Students in Ms. Rempel and Ms. Lutz’s class worked over the course of six weeks to conceive products, create a business plan, then create and sell their products. Thank you to everyone who purchased products and supported our students!
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PARENTING CORNER
Visions of Video Games Dancing Through Their Heads? How the Media Manipulates Kids
Author: George F. Drinka, MD Source

Worried that the media is turning your child into a professional mini-consumer whose main focus is on getting more stuff? Pop culture, ads and TV shows all play into how our kids see the holidays — and themselves. Today’s guest blog post comes from child and adolescent psychiatrist Dr. George Drinka.

As we enter the holiday season, we can expect to experience in every family room across America a stupefying collision of two societal sentiments. The one embodies the original spirit of the holidays: the message of love of family, brotherly and sisterly love, and a sense of community and spiritual uplift. The other is perhaps best epitomized by Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving when frenzied consumer spending pushes many American stores from the red into the black for the calendar year.

While parents are usually aware of the tension between these two spirits of the holidays and the need to temper their buying regardless of how deeply they love their kids, their offspring are usually oblivious to this conflict. Children spend more and more of their leisure time encamped before screens, watching their favorite sitcoms or cartoon series, buried in video games, or peeking at unfiltered YouTube film shorts on the Internet. As we run off to the shopping malls to buy our kids presents, we find the kids at home peppered by cheery messages in the form of advertisements that serve as bookends, so to speak, for their favorite shows.

While these advertisements are usually humorous, engaging, and supposedly kid-friendly, the pop culture in which children live is quite deceiving. Essentially, the media works to condition children to be consumers looking after their own pleasures rather than human beings interested in the wellbeing of others.

Media advertisements, always crafted by adults other than the kids’ parents, are carefully devised and audience-tested to do one thing: sell our children a product. This mission is done so cleverly that the kid thinks that buying the product was his or her idea, not a media message at all. And the child clamors for the parent to go get it.

Of course, there is nothing wrong in itself with humans buying and using consumer items. After all, the economic downturn through which we have been living would be much diminished if consumers had more buying power, which would fuel the sales of many big ticket items. But the problem arises for humans and especially for children when items “need to be” purchased in order for the child to feel good inside, to fend off sorrow or boredom, loneliness or internal confusion.

In my work as a child and adolescent psychiatrist, I have seen scores of kids who turn to eating, drinking alcohol, buying clothing or make-up in order to bury feelings of inadequacy, sadness, and shame. And this trend starts earlier still when kids clamor for certain toys or dolls or games, which they play for a few months and then discard, relegating to some closet or dusty shelf. Also, I have known many kids who begin to define who they are as humans on what they own or wear, what games they receive on Christmas day or their birthday. While the fun seems real enough, the person is only momentarily gratified. This activity of consuming is a truly shallow way to define the self. Our society, however, often encourages such self-definition, which flies in the face of the original meaning of the holidays.

How then can we impact on these firmly-entrenched cultural trends? I recommend three very basic approaches:

1. First, parents do well to set a dollar limit on what they will spend on their children’s holiday presents. This will both quell your anxiety about the price tag and clarify for the kids that limits are not simply necessary but actually good for them developmentally.

2. Second, work to create a tradition of children giving presents too:to parents, siblings and best friends. In so doing, parents will underscore the central premise of the holidays: giving rather than receiving.

3. Finally, children should be encouraged to write letters to extended family members like grandparents or cherished aunts, uncles or cousins as part of a holiday tradition. Let them know that their expression of love and appreciation to significant others is in many ways the greatest gift of all.

Read more: http://www.empoweringparents.com/blog/technology-and-kids/visions-of-video-games-holidays-consumerism-child-self-image/#ixzz2EWJMCLdt

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
December 11-Term 1 reports home
December 13-Early dismissal at 1:27 p.m. for parent-teacher conferences
December 14-PAC hot lunch
December 19-Winter concerts at 1 and 6:30 p.m.
December 21-Last day of school before holidays
January 7, 2013…Welcome back!

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Vanier News – December 1, 2012

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SUPER DOG “Tom”

Assemblies are a time to come together, share, have fun, and learn. Sometimes we even have special visitors. At our last assembly on November 30th, we were fortunate to have a Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) service dog and handler visit our school. “Tom” was expertly handled by Roger Edwards and showed off his incredible ability to sniff out illegal material crossing the border. Special thanks to Mrs. Engelman for helping arrange this special visit. Watch Tom do his work:

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FIT KIDS

FIT KIDS is a special program that runs on Fridays at Georges Vanier. This year, teacher Ron O’Neil is organizing the program with his student leaders. Senior students lead younger students through a challenging fitness circuit that emphasizes many skills including balance, reaction time, and strength.

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POWERFUL LANGUAGE

Writing isn’t simply correctly forming letters or spelling words properly. Effective writers communicate ideas clearly and create an emotion in the reader. Mrs. Chohan’s Grade 4/5 class has been working on improving their writing by using descriptive and powerful language. They recently completed an assignment called “The Most Important Thing…” Several samples are shared below:

The Most Important Thing About Bella is…

The most important thing about Bella is that she is lovely.

She has a strong mind because no one can break her spirit because when someone disagrees with her she doesn’t change her mind.

My sister is a speeding bullet because she wins races on our way to school in the morning.

My sister is so hilarious because when we play video games in my room she makes funny jokes.

My sister is really fun to play with because she has lots of imagination when we play games after school.

But, the most important thing about Bella is that she is lovely.

-Josh Z.

The Most Important Thing

The most important thing about my dad is that he’s fun.

He likes taking long walks to DQ with me, we always laugh about funny stuff and eat our blizzards while we walk home.

He loves to tell jokes, even if he knows some are pretty lame, he likes telling them anyway.

He’s pretty strong, probably not like Hercules, but he’s strong. I like it when he swings me by the arms.

When he comes home from work, the aroma around him smells like construction.

But the most important thing about my dad is that he is fun.

-Kiera B.

The Important Thing About My Grandma

The important thing about my Grandma is that she is loving.

When I am sick she pats me on the back or on the head. My Grandma takes care of me until I am feeling well.

When I hug her she is so warm and cozy.

My Grandma is so cuddly, just like a cloud, and I also feel like I am touching a pillow filled with feathers inside.

When she gets mad at me she doesn’t talk to me, I feel along and like nobody’s with me.

But the most important thing about my Grandma is that my Grandma is loving.

-Gurleen S.

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Study of MATTER
Division 15 has been learning the three states of matter, solids, liquids, and gases. Please enjoy the graffiti art the class created to conclude the unit on matter.

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ATTENDANCE MATTERS

Attendance DOES matter! We know that students who attend school every day and on time, do better in school. Research also tells us that absenteeism in the early years is an accurate predictor to dropping out of school later in life. In an effort to support students and families, our District is now into the second year of the Attendance Matters (A.M.) project. The purpose is to track attendance of our K-3 students and support families in getting their children to school. We are thankful to have Mr. Harman Dhaliwal working with us and our families. We also have a daily breakfast club that is free to families. Our breakfast club runs from 7:45 a.m. everyday and is an opportunity for students to have a bite to eat, meet with peers, and participate in literacy activities prior to starting the day. Questions? Come visit us at the school.

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Primary STARS
Congratulations to our Primary STARS for the month of NOVEMBER!

photo (12)Division 10: Harjot, Marisa, Pavrose
Division 11: Prisaha Rahul, Bhavjot
Division 12: Maygen Armaan Kanwar
Division 13: Dayton, Rhea, Tyrell
Division 14: Jaskirat, Sahil, Avreen, Matthew
Division 15: Aniyah, Sanya, Gurparsad, Markus
Division 16: Amena, Gurjap, Aerial
Division 17: Omohit, Kirandeep, Kiara
Division 18: Harvir, Chandnhi, Ashley
Division 19: Sara, Jovan, Mankiran
Division 20: Sireena, Gavin, Yusuf
Division 21: Rajdip, Ravleen, Amaar
Division 22: Yashnoor, Nolan, Sabeeka

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ATHLETICS

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Congratulations Girls Volleyball team on your 2nd Place Finish.

Boys volleyball team celebrates their 3rd Place finish.

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PENNIES FOR WATER
At our assembly this Friday, our students learned that, incredibly, much of the world does not have access to clean water. Our leadership team has decided to take action. In conjunction with the penny going out of circulation in Canada, our leadership team is running a penny drive to raise money for clean water in Third World countries. You can help by sending any pennies you may have to school with your child. Every penny counts! Thank you for your support. Here’s the video we watched at our assembly:

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LEARNING COMMONS NEWS

Check out this Slideshare which features some great illustrations and aspirations.
Divisions 10 to 18 created Showme videos which may be viewed at
Reminders:
  • If you are travelling on an extended vacation please be sure to return all library books before you go.
  • Students in Divisions 7, 8 and 9 are asked to bring in their permission forms for the ‘Natural Distasters Club’

Check out what’s been happening in the Learning Commons!

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PAC NEWS
Thank you parents for your generous support of the fundraisers we have done so far this year. You’ll recall that because of your hard work, we have a beautiful, brand-new, piece of playground equipment for our students to use. We raised over $1600 through our SaveAround coupon book fundraiser, $600 at our recent movie night, and $450 through our Dessertco fundraiser. Great job! Dessertco orders can be picked up after school on Monday, December 3, and your Poinsettia orders can be picked up after school on December 5.

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REPORT CARDS

Report cards will be coming home on Tuesday, December 11. Parent teacher conferences take place on Thursday, December 13. On this day, there is an early dismissal at 1:27 PM. Please take this opportunity to discuss your child’s progress with their teacher. Please phone the office to make an appointment. 604-596-1030.
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CHRISTMAS CONCERT

Mrs. Scheller is working hard to prepare our students for the upcoming Christmas concerts. Concerts take place on Wednesday, December 19. There will be two shows: 1:00 PM and 6:30 PM. Information about purchasing tickets will come home shortly. General Admission tickets will sell for $2 while special $5 tickets will be sold that will be put you into a draw for upgraded FRONT ROW couch seating. Stay tuned!

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: POWERPLAY STRATEGIES SHOW.

Students have been creating and marketing their own products. Now it’s time to sell. The PowerPlay show is taking place next Friday, December 7, from 9:30 AM to 1:30 PM. Come visit us in the gym and get started on your Christmas shopping. Part proceeds of this event go to selected charities.

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Young entrepreneurs show off their products at a recent assembly.

  • “I like power play because we are donating to charity and I love helping.” Simran K.
  • “I like power play because I get to draw.” Justin S.
  • “I like power play because it is fun and I get to learn how to make my own business and I get the money that I make.” Kye H.
  • “It makes me want to make a job.” Sahil M.
  • “I like it because it inspires me to start a business and to get well with money.” Hayley M.
  • “I like power play because you make stuff and sell it and make your own money. That’s why I like it.” Abdullah S.
  • “I like power play because it’s for a good cause.” Rohin C.
  • “Why I like it (power play) is because it’s pretty cool starting a first business.” Pritpal S.
  • “I like power play because it’s fun making products.” Puneet S.
  • “I like power play because I get to make and sell my own product.” Armina B.
  • “I like power play because it’s teaching us how to start a business and we are earning money.” Hayal M.
  • “I like it (power play) because you can have fun and do crafts.” Maegan H.
  • “It is fun!” Braxton B.
  • “I love power play because it helps me earn and be more responsible with money.” Aden B.
  • “I love power play because we get to make stuff and we donate money to charity.” Risham M.

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PARENTING CORNER

Parenting Tip of the Day: Remember what it’s like to be a kid

Remember the joy of a fresh pack of crayons, the great smell of Playdoh or the thrill and awkwardness of your first date? Do you remember what it felt like to be standing in that first dorm room or apartment with the full weight and excitement of adulthood resting on your shoulders?

Part of the joy of parenting is reliving the memories of your own childhood as your child creates their own. And, part of the responsibility of parenthood is remembering what it was like to be their age and revisit those feelings in order to better empathize and interact with your children.

At four, you could never move as fast as your parents wanted you to and you were sure you had seen that monster under the bed. At nine you were probably tired of being treated like a little kid but were unsure of how to navigate the world of a big kid.

Before you ask your teen the timeless question “What were you thinking?” Try to think back to what you were thinking when you pulled a similar stunt. Our past experiences aren’t meant to be used as a bat to club our kids over the head with “You’ll understand when you get older,” but as a tool to be used to approach our kid’s life issues with understanding.

Source: Examiner.com

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WHAT’S COMING UP?

December 3-Dessertco order pick up at 2:30 p.m.
December 4-PAC Meeting at 9:00 a.m.
December 5-Poinsettia order pick up at 2:30 p.m.
December 11-Term 1 reports home
December 13-Early dismissal at 1:27 p.m. for parent-teacher conferences
December 14-PAC hot lunch
December 19-Winter concerts at 1 and 6:30 p.m.
December 21-Last day of school before holidays
January 7, 2013…Welcome back!

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