Vanier News – December 24, 2013

This week at Georges Vanier:

IN THIS ISSUE

PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE
IMG_2819December was a busy and exciting month at Georges Vanier Elementary. Report cards went home at the start of the month and reading teacher comments, I can tell that many of our students are making good personal progress and responding to our efforts to make learning experiences as interesting and authentic as possible.

From December 9-13, our school held our first ever INNOVATION WEEK. It was an opportunity for students to learn about anything they wanted to, and to share their learning with others. I was particularly impressed with students’ ability to be self-directed. While INNOVATION WEEK was taking place in the gym, students in other classes were participating in Learn A New Skill week and building Rube-Goldberg machines. How fun!

Last week, we held our Christmas Concerts. Based on the feedback I received from parents, our concerts were a great success.

Thank you parents for the tremendous amount of support you give the school. On a personal note, I want to say THANK YOU for the many gifts, cards, and well-wishes I received last week – it means a lot to me and makes me feel very fortunate to be part of such a warm, welcoming, connected community like ours!

I wish you all a safe and happy holiday and I look forward to seeing you all back at school on January 6, 2014!
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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Mystery Number Skype
IMG_3773Last week, students in Ms. Henderson and Ms. Warkentin’s classes had the opportunity to participate in an activity called Mystery Number Skype. Essentially, students connect via video conference with students from other schools trying to guess a mystery number based on questions asked. For example, students can ask questions such as:

  • Is your number greater than…
  • Is your number a prime number?
  • Is the digit in the hundreds place odd?

IMG_3772Activities such as this help students develop number sense, or an understanding of what numbers represent and how numbers are related to each other. Students also learn that playing with numbers can be fun. In fact, once we had finished the session in Ms. Henderson’s class, a student immediately asked, “When can we do this again?” What a great sign!

This week, we worked together with classes from Beaver Creek Elementary in Surrey. Thank you Mr. Monroe and Mr. Mann. We look forward to connecting with other schools in Surrey and beyond!

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LEARNING COMMONS NEWS
The weather outside may have been frightful but inside the Learning Commons it was so delightful! This week we served warm apple cider, sat by our virtual cozy fire and listened to some great Christmas stories.

Students in the Vanier Learning Commons are sharing their learning with the world. Follow us on Twitter @VanierLC to find out what the students are tweeting about. All tweets are moderated by the Teacher Librarian. We only access tweets that originate from other classes, schools and educators or those we can learn from. We are excited to explore the possibilities with this new way of connecting with the world.

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Anna Crosland M.Ed. – Teacher Librarian

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QUOTE of the WEEK
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VIDEO of the WEEK: Paying it Forward
It feels great when people do something special for us. It feels even better when we do something special for others. Please watch and discuss this video with your child:

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
January

  • 6 – School re-opens
  • 16 – Kindergarten Registration Begins
  • 23 – Primary Spelling Bee – 1:30 p.m. (this is a NEW date for this event)

February

  • 10 – Family Day – Classes not in session
  • 20 – Science Fair
  • 21 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

March

  • 11 – Term 2 Reports Home
  • 13 – Early Dismissal – 1:27 p.m.
  • 14 – Last day of classes before Spring Break
  • 17-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
  • 31 – Classes Resume

April

  • 10 – Intermediate Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 17 – Movie Night – Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • 18 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
  • 21 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

May

  • 2 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 8 – Primary Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 14 – Early dismissal at 1:27 p.m. for Student-Led Conferences
  • 19 – Victoria Day – Classes not in session
  • 26 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

June

  • 13 – Sports Day
  • 20 – Grade 7 Celebration – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Year-End Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Term 3 Reports Home/Early Dismissal at 1:27 p.m./Last day of classes

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Parents, please leave a COMMENT…

Vanier News – October 20, 2013

This Week at Georges Vanier…

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IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK: Having an authentic audience (someone other than just the classroom teacher) encourages learners to do better work.

Click here to view previous poll questions and results

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PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING – KIVA AT GEORGES VANIER
Watch the video below to learn about Kiva…

Last year, our Grade 7 students raised close to $4000 during their 30-Hour Famine. They decided to devote a third of the money raised to Kiva.  This past week, students themselves researched loans they would support.  Check Georges Vanier’s Kiva page to see entrepreneurs in third world countries that our students decided to support with loans:  http://www.kiva.org/lender/georges5119

This is an example of the real-world learning we are trying to promote at our school. Students learn first-hand about poverty, global issues, and financial responsibility. The best part is that when loans are repaid, money can be used again to fund new loans.

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WE DAY – 2013
IMG_0658.JPGThis past Friday, Mrs. Rempel and members of our Leadership Team had the opportunity to attend WE DAY at Rogers Arena in Vancouver. They heard many speakers, including Martin Luther King III. He challenged kids to do their best at whatever they choose to do. The example he used was that of a street sweeper…if you are a street sweeper, then sweep streets like Shakespeare wrote poetry.

Students are now challenged to look at their own schools, communities, and the world, and ask the question, “What difference can I make?”

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STUDENT-LED CONFERENCES – October 24, 2013
YOU ARE INVITED to attend “Student-Led Conferences” at Georges Vanier Elementary on Thursday, October 24th from 2:30 – 4:00 p.m.

What are “Student-Led Conferences?” Student-Led Conferences are an opportunity for your child to personally share information about their learning. Your child will take the lead during the conferences, share samples of their work, demonstrate skills, discuss goals, and answer any questions you might have.

Why “Student-Led Conferences?” Student-Led Conferences:

  • Encourage students to accept personal responsibility for their academic performance
  • Help students recognize and take ownership for the things that interfered with their learning success
  • Teach students the process of self-evaluation
  • Develop students’ oral communication skills and organizational skills
  • Increase students’ self-confidence
  • Enhance communication between student and parents.

We hope you are able to attend this special event. Students will be working hard to gather work samples and reflect on their progress so far this term. Please indicate below if you are able to attend your child’s Student-Led conference. If you are not able to, your child will conduct the Conference at home. Thank you in advance for your support.

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PARENTING CORNER: Calm Mom: 5 Ways to Be a Present Parent
Author: Julie Kailus
Source

Let’s face it, life with kids is challenging. Yet you see those moms who seem to breeze through it all, unflappable. They have an annoyingly effortless way of seeming cool, collected, kind, peaceful and in control — even when surrounded by chaos.

That composed way of mothering isn’t out of reach for you, say mindful mothering experts and moms who are borrowing techniques from practices like yoga and meditation to boost their calm-mom powers.

Try these five tips and make being a calm mom look like child’s play. Continue Reading –>
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LEARNING COMMONS NEWS

Congratulations to all of the great readers at Georges Vanier. Our school has circulated hundreds of ebooks from our new online collection. Most students have a login and user id. The last few class notices will be going home next week. Check it out via our Learning Commons website:  http://georgesvanierlibrary.edublogs.org/  > Catalogue > Scroll to Georges Vanier > Follett Shelf

Take a look at lots of Scurvy Pirates made by Divisions 14 and 15 using the Pirate Cam App at http://georgesvanierlibrary.edublogs.org/  Arrrr!

And…just one more week until the Book Fair…October 28th to November 1st. Yahoo!

Anna Crosland M.Ed. – Teacher Librarian

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QUOTE of the WEEK
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VIDEO of the WEEK: Creativity Takes Time
We know that education is much more than remembering facts and taking in as much information as possible. Education is much more about encouraging students to be creative problem solvers. Today’s students will be required to solve problems in the future that do not yet exist. Watch and discuss this video with your child. Do you give your child the time to be creative?

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
October

  • 22 – PAC Hot Lunch
  • 23 – Division 10 – Clay Workshop – Surrey Arts Centre – 9:00 – 12:30 p.m.
  • 24 – Student-Led Conferences – 2:27 p.m.
  • 25 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 28 – Book Fair (runs to November 1)
  • 29 – PAC Executive Meeting – 9:00 a.m.

November

  • 4 – SaveAround Coupon Book Fundraiser begins
  • 5 – PAC Meeting – 9:00 a.m.
  • 7 – Remembrance Day Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
  • 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 11 – Remembrance Day – Classes not in session
  • 15 – Movie Night – Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • 18 – Motivational Magic with Steve Harmer – 1:00 p.m.
  • 21 – Math Night – 6:00 – 7:00 p.m.
  • 25-29 – Flashlight reading – Learning Commons

December

  • 10 – Term 1 Reports Home
  • 12 – Grade 7 Band Concert – Gym – 9:00 a.m.
  • 12 – Early Dismissal – 1:27 p.m.
  • 18 – Winter Concerts (times to be announced)
  • 20 – Last day of classes before holidays

January

  • 6 – School re-opens
  • 16 – Primary Spelling Bee – 1:30 p.m.

February

  • 10 – Family Day – Classes not in session
  • 20  – Science Fair
  • 21 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

March

  • 11 – Term 2 Reports Home
  • 13 – Early Dismissal – 1:27 p.m.
  • 14 – Last day of classes before Spring Break
  • 17-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
  • 31 – Classes Resume

April

  • 10 – Intermediate Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 17 – Movie Night – Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • 18 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
  • 21 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

May

  • 2 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 8 – Primary Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 14 – Early dismissal at 1:27 p.m. for Student-Led Conferences
  • 19 – Victoria Day – Classes not in session
  • 26 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

June

  • 13 – Sports Day
  • 20 – Grade 7 Celebration – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Year-End Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Term 3 Reports Home/Early Dismissal at 1:27 p.m./Last day of classes

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Parents, please leave a COMMENT…

Vanier News – October 6, 2013

IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK:

Click here to view previous poll questions and results

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Mystery Skype

We know that when student work on authentic learning tasks, they see purpose in what they are doing and are motivated to do their very best. At Vanier, we continually try provide these opportunities and our students are responding. Mrs. Tracey’s class recently had the opportunity to participate in an activity called Mystery Skype. Students from different places in the world video-conference and take turns asking questions of each other, guessing where the other class is from. Students had a great time talking with students from Quakerville, Pennsylvania. We look forward to connecting with more students from around the world.

IMPORTANT PAC MEETING: Tuesday, October 8

An important PAC Meeting will take this coming Tuesday, October 8 at 9:00 a.m. Important matters are discussed at every meeting, but this week, parents will be nominated and elected to executive positions. These positions include: President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer.

We greatly appreciate executive members who have served in the past and welcome all parents to participate in PAC meetings and events if possible.

Please see below for upcoming PAC events. See you on the 8th!
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ATHLETICS
Our cross country meet this past Tuesday was cancelled due to heavy rain, but our boys and girls soccer team managed to squeeze in 2 games each. Both teams are improving with every game and will continue with matches this coming week. We hope that the weather cooperates and we are able to attend our final 2 cross country meets on October 8 and 15 at Bear Creek Park.

Special thanks to teacher sponsors who dedicate their free time to students so athletics can take place. We are thankful for the contributions from Ms. Henderson, Mrs. Porpaczy, Mrs. Willis, Mr. White, Mrs. Silversides, Mr. McDonald, and Mr. Vendramin.

We also can’t forget you – our supportive parents – for driving student athletes to games!
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PARENTING CORNER: Does Popularity Really Matter?
Author: Barbara Rowley
Source

cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by Ed Yourdon

My daughter Katie was only a second-grader when she used a phrase I didn’t think I’d hear for years. “I’m not popular,” she announced matter-of-factly at dinner one night. “Me and Izzy think Zoe is the most popular girl in our class.”

Instantly, I found myself defensive on her behalf, eager for my daughter to be every bit as popular as Zoe. “But you have lots of friends!” She looked back at me, seeming a bit confused. “I know,” she said. “But Zoe is popular.”

I had missed the point. At 8, Katie understood the difference between friendships and the high social status that is popularity, a distinction that kids sense—and can begin to play to—as early as preschool. “Even very young kids know who has the social power in the classroom,” says Tracy Vaillancourt, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa, “and by fifth or sixth grade, popularity can become nearly all-consuming.”

Well-meaning parents (like me) encourage their kids to pursue popularity—as if it were synonymous with success. It’s not. What makes kids outcasts in school—usually an unwillingness to conform—often translates into success as an adult. Many companies—including Yahoo!—prioritize hiring quirky individuals who shun conventional thinking. When you grow up, you see that the most popular kids aren’t necessarily the ones who come out on top, but you don’t understand that when you’re 11. Social science researchers are emphatic that it doesn’t guarantee adoration, either. “Being popular is not necessarily about being well-liked,” says journalist Alexandra Robbins, who studied school society for her book The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth. “It’s more about clawing your way to the top of the social hierarchy and then working your tail off to stay there.”

Continue Reading –>

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LEARNING COMMONS NEWS – eBOOKS

photo-181Georges Vanier students are reading eBooks. Our school is helping the District to pilot a new electronic book program. Students are able to browse picture books, novels and non-fiction materials. Items may also be ‘checked out’ for home reading with a student username and password. The collection is growing but already has lots of new titles and some old favourites.

Also, mark your calendars: Fall Book Fair Oct 28th to Nov 1st. Yahoo!

Anna Crosland M.Ed. – Teacher Librarian

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EMERGENCY DISMISSAL DAY – A Great Success

Our yearly Emergency Dismissal Practice took place Friday, October 4th. While nothing is perfect, feedback from both parents and staff indicate the event was a great success.  We commenced the event with a fire drill, accounted for every child, moved down to the grass field, then began to dismiss students to their parents.

Thank you parents for your support and patience, and thank you staff for your leadership and teamwork. We hope we will never need to dismiss students after an emergency such as an earthquake or fire, but it is comforting to know that if it were necessary, we have a plan in place!

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QUOTE of the WEEK

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VIDEO of the WEEK: Random Acts of Kindness.

The world is changing rapidly. We have the challenge of preparing our children for a future that does not yet exist. Learners now need to be creative, culturally aware, problem solvers, innovators, effective communicators, collaborative, curious, responsible, productive, accountable, and leaders. Please watch and discuss this video with your child.

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
October

  • 8 – PAC Meeting – 9:00 a.m.
  • 8 – Cross Country Meet at Bear Creek Park – 2:45 – 4:30 p.m.
  • 9 – Division 11 to Surrey Arts Centre for clay workshop – afternoon
  • 10 – Grade 7 Day camp at Golden Ears Park – 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.
  • 14 – Thanksgiving Day – Classes not in session
  • 15 – Cross Country Meet at Bear Creek Park – 2:45 – 4:30 p.m.
  • 17 – Intermediate Spelling Bee – 10:45 a.m.
  • 22 – PAC Hot Lunch
  • 24 – Student-Led Conferences – 2:27 p.m.
  • 25 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 28 – Book Fair (runs to November 1)

November

  • 7 – Remembrance Day Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
  • 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 11 – Remembrance Day – Classes not in session
  • 15 – Movie Night – Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • 21 – Math Night – 6:00 – 7:00 p.m.

December

  • 10 – Term 1 Reports Home
  • 12 – Early Dismissal – 1:27 p.m.
  • 18 – Winter Concerts (times to be announced)
  • 20 – Last day of classes before holidays

January

  • 6 – School re-opens
  • 16 – Primary Spelling Bee – 1:30 p.m.

February

  • 10 – Family Day – Classes not in session
  • 20  – Science Fair
  • 21 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

March

  • 11 – Term 2 Reports Home
  • 13 – Early Dismissal – 1:27 p.m.
  • 14 – Last day of classes before Spring Break
  • 17-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
  • 31 – Classes Resume

April

  • 10 – Intermediate Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 17 – Movie Night – Doors open at 6:00 p.m.
  • 18 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
  • 21 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

May

  • 2 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
  • 8 – Primary Speechfest – 1:00 p.m.
  • 14 – Early dismissal at 1:27 p.m. for Student-Led Conferences
  • 19 – Victoria Day – Classes not in session
  • 26 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

June

  • 13 – Sports Day
  • 20 – Grade 7 Celebration – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Year-End Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
  • 26 – Term 3 Reports Home/Early Dismissal at 1:27 p.m./Last day of classes

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Parents, please leave a COMMENT…

Vanier News – January 13, 2012

IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK


Previous poll questions and results:

  • Should school uniforms be considered at Georges Vanier Elementary? YES: 68% NO: 32%
  • Does violence in video games promote violent behaviour in children? YES: 86% NO: 14%
  • Should security cameras be used at our school? YES: 89% NO: 11%

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A Little Support Goes a LONG Way

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A “Special” Visitor creates questioning Kindergarten Students
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We were fortunate this past week (though some who don’t like spiders would debate that) to have Roan, one of our Kindergarten students, share his pet tarantula with us. The most important aspect of this sharing was the wonder and awe created in our youngest students. Here is a sample of the thoughtful questions asked about Roan’s tarantula:

  • Question: What does it eat? Answer: Crickets. He eats four crickets once per month. He only eats live crickets that he catches in his cage. The tarantula will spin a web around the cricket and save it for feeding later.
  • Question: Is it poisonous? Answer: Yes, the tarantula’s spikey hairs are poisonous. If he senses danger he can project the poisonous hairs up to 6 feet to protect himself from attackers. When a human gets stung by one of these tarantula hairs, it will causes a very itchy blood blister.
  • Question: Why do we have to be very quiet around him? Answer: The spider is scared of loud noises and if he feels scared he might make himself look really big and then project his poisonous hairs. We want to respect the spider’s needs and also protect ourselves.
  • Question: Do they eat people? Answer: No, he’s too small for that.
  • Question: Why does he sleep? Answer: He gets tired like you and me and then he needs to sleep so he’s not tired.

Thank you to Ms, Bujan for compiling and sharing these questions.

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Kindergarten Registration
Children who turn 5 before January 1, 2014 are eligible to begin school in September, 2013. Registration begins at all Elementary schools in Surrey on Monday, January 21, 2013. Please click here to read more…

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PARENTING CORNER: PARENTING WITH LOVE AND LOGICAL CONSEQUENCES
Source

How does parenting with love and logical consequences work? It works because it emphasizes learning of what the consequences are and understanding the purpose of the consequences. It teaches independence and responsibility, not only from the child learning from theconsequences of his behavior, but due to the fact the child participates in determining the consequences. Parents must always be prepared to modify the consequences depending upon the situation and the child.

A healthy child needs the setting of consequences and consistent limits because as he grows toward adulthood he will, eventually, have to face the consequences of his actions anyway. Parenting with love and logical consequences will properly prepare your child for the future.

Parenting with love and logical consequences applies to limit setting too. Limit setting refers to your expectations, regarding how you expect your child to act or behave each day. It’s important for care givers to discuss their behavioral expectations with the child in advance so that he comes to know and agree with these expectations before he breaks any of the rules. Parenting with love and logical consequences teaches the child what
the rules are and what to expect when the rules are broken.

For example, one rule of conduct might be no swearing. It’s important to go over words considered swear words, and what the consequences will be for breaking this rule. An example, of a consequence, depending upon the age of the child, is having him spend time in his room writing about swearing. How he feels hearing other kids swear? How he thinks others react to his swearing. Where he learned to swear? What are his future swearing plans? Why he swore this time? One can make the list longer in proportion to the depth of the problem. Then one can discuss the problem with the child and make the length of that discussion, also, proportional to the problem.

Hence, in parenting with love and logical consequences, the child learns about his negative behavior. Rather than simply being punished for it, he is made to think about it, and its consequences.

Setting limits work better if reasons for the rule are explained, in such a manner, that the child, not only understands the reasons, but, also, realizes it is for his own betterment. This is what parenting with love and logical consequences is all about.

What’s more, the explanation and the consequences must be age appropriate. A five year old might be simply told that swearing sounds bad, where a ten year old might be asked what he thinks of someone who swears, or that you don’t like swearing because it is often loud and upsetting, and other people find it disturbing as well. Moreover, it might be explained that swearing indicates a lack of emotional control, and we all need to learn to control our emotions to a certain degree. Thus parenting with love and logical consequences takes into account the age of the child.

Consequences work better when they can be agreed upon by both parent and child since then the child is more likely to comply with a consequence he helped create. It might be that a five year old will take a five minute time out as her consequence, but a ten year old might agree to a 10 minute time out spent in his room thinking about what he said and why it happened. As mentioned previously, they could write about what caused them to curse and what they could do to prevent it from happening next time. Then they might explain to you what they wrote. Hence, parenting with love and and logical consequences increases the child’s commitment to betterment by encouraging him to contribute to the program.

It is important to keep in mind that parenting with love and logical consequences is not a one size fits all program. The five year old might spend two minutes sitting down in the kitchen thinking about what he did and then be able to talk to you about it when he’s done. Different consequences are appropriate for different ages and different children. Tailor consequences to suit your children.

Keep in mind punishment is not the goal, but improved behavior. It is important to see that limits are consistently enforced and not changed haphazardly. This can confuse the child and prevent the consequence from effectively decreasing the undesirable behavior. If the child thinks he can talk you out of a consequence, then he will try. It is best not to listen to excuses, but simply demand the child face the agreed upon consequences forthwith. Therefore, simply tell the child to go to his room or whatever behavioral consequence was agreed upon. The more you allow the child to delay, control or change the consequences once he has misbehaved, the less effective they will be, and the more the undesirable behavior will remain or worsen. Although parenting with love and logical consequences is tailored for each unique child, it must be consistently followed and enforced.

On the other hand, it is important not to apply consequences that are too harsh. The point is not to make the child suffer, but to help him learn from his mistakes. This page isn’t meant to discuss limit setting and consequences in a detailed manner, on account of the fact that this is such a vast subject that books have been written about this topic. Reading one or two of these books and discussing any questions you might have with a counselor should save any parent a lot of time and trouble.

Unlike the Ten Commandments, these books are guides and needn’t be followed verbatim. Rather, such materials can be used as a resource upon which you can develop your own approach to limit setting, one that you can tailor to suit you and your family.

Despite my cursory introduction to parenting with love and logical consequences, this topic is extremely important for it is through the experiencing of parenting with love and logical consequences that a child becomes prepared to live with real world consequences for her actions once she leaves the safety of her home. It is through the setting of reasonable limits and consequences that a parent teaches the child to control her own behavior. 

In other words, this is how the child learns self-control. This self-control applies to the child’s control of her own emotions. Imagine how difficult and confusing it must be for a child that never had the good fortune of learning how to cope with and control her own emotions? Imagine how much you can help your child with this task by providing them with, not only proper limits and consequences but providing the older child with the logical reasoning behind such goals that she can understand.

Limit and behavioral consequence setting by the parent is crucial in order for children to learn to reason what the consequences of their actions will be, and to develop the inner control to calm themselves down, after a stressful
situation. Children learn all these abilities and more chiefly from their parents.

The following is a summary of how to parent with love and logical consequences:

  1. Make sure your child clearly understands how you expect him to behave.
  2. Discuss the consequences of misbehavior and get his input on what those consequences might be.
  3. Remember children are more likely to comply with consequences they helped create.
  4. Have your child explain to you and role play what behaviors you expect of him.
  5. Consequences for misbehavior should not emphasize punishment but learning to do the right thing by thinking about the problem and discussing it.
  6. Have him explain the consequences so you can be sure he understands them clearly.
  7. Don’t forget to praise and point out positive behavior and the consequences of good behavior!
  8. Catch your child behaving positively and praise him. Try to see there are three praise statements to every
    negative statement.
  9. Be sure the child understands that the consequences, both negative and positive, are for his own betterment.
  10. Be sure all behavioral expectations and consequences are age appropriate and child appropriate. Remember kids are different. Tailor consequences to suit your children.

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LEARNING COMMONS NEWS
Students in Divisions 7, 8 and 9 are enjoying a lunch time reading club in the Learning Commons. We are reading ‘I Survived Hurricane Katrina’ by Lauren Tarshis. Our slogan is ‘Learning Gives you Super Powers’. Students will be learning about hurricanes, global warming, sustainability and recycling.
We will be creating student designed books, painting T Shirts and finding stamps from the countries we discuss and will have a celebration at the end of the project in March. Students will be creating a video which will be presented during an assembly and posted on the Learning Commons blog.

Reading Gives you Super Powers! - Josh Z.

Reading Gives you Super Powers! – Josh Z.

A reminder that Division 7 meets on Tuesdays, Division 8 on Wednesdays and Division 9 on Thursdays.

Click here to see what’s happening in the Georges Vanier Learning Commons…

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Mystery Skype
This past Wednesday was a busy day for Ms. Chohan and Ms. Lutz’s class as they each participated in Mystery Skype sessions.  During Mystery Skype, classes ‘virtually’ connect with other classes around the world using free video communication software called Skype. We can see them and they can see us. Classes take turns asking strategic questions, trying to figure out where the other class is from. Students learn about questioning skills, as well as directions and geography. Click here to learn more about Mystery Skype. This past week, Ms. Chohan’s class connected with a class in Budd Lake, New Jersey, while Ms. Lutz’s class got to know a class from Dominion City, Manitoba. Listen to what our students had to say about this authentic learning experience:
Rohin: “I liked it [Mystery Skype] because it took us a long time and we got to answer questions and we had jobs to do.”
Puneet: “At the beginning I was shy to talk, but after I spoke once or twice I wasn’t shy. Also, I really had to think twice before I wasted questions.”
Aden: “I enjoyed Mystery Skype because it challenged me to pin point a location.”
Risham: “I felt really good about Skyping because I liked my job. I would like to do it again!”
Jocelyn: “It felt really good to meet new people from somewhere else. At first, I thought they were British. It was fun!”
Maegan: “I liked it [Mystery Skype] because it was fun. I enjoyed my job as the ‘Runner’.”
Kye: “It was fun doing the Mystery Skype because I liked my job, it was a bit hard in the beginning, but it was really fun afterwards.”

Ms. Chohan's class connects virtually with students from Budd Lake, New Jersey.

Ms. Chohan’s class connects virtually with students from Budd Lake, New Jersey.

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FREE FAMILY COUNSELLING

In addition to services provided at Georges Vanier by counsellor Lisa Jouzy, students in Surrey School District and their parents or guardians have access to a range of free family counselling services through a partnership with Simon Fraser University’s Faculty of Education.

SFU provides counsellors for the centre — qualified staff and graduate students conducting practicums — while the school district contributes the clinic facilities.
Counselling promotes the mental health of individuals and families and this often also addresses barriers to student learning.

Counselling services are available for a range of personal issues, including parenting, bereavement, depression, anxiety, bullying and sexual orientation.

The SFU Surrey Counselling Centre, which opened in 2009, is located at L.A. Matheson Secondary, 9484 122nd St. Call 604-587-7320 to make an appointment.

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
January 16 – Uzume Taiko fine arts performance – 10:45 a.m.
January 21 – Kindergarten Registration Begins
January 28 – Clothes on Wheels at Vanier
February 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
February 11 – Family Day Holiday – Classes not in session
March 18-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
March 29 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
April 1 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session
April 2 – Term 2 Reports Home
April 4 – Early Dismissal at 1:27 p.m.
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Vanier News – December 23, 2012

IN THIS ISSUE

POLL QUESTION of the WEEK


Previous poll questions and results:

  • Does violence in video games promote violent behaviour in children? YES: 86% NO: 14%
  • Should security cameras be used at our school? YES: 89% NO: 11%

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SEASON’S GREETINGS

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POEMS FROM THE HEART – Writing by Mrs. Rempel’s Grade 5/6/7 Class
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PARENTING CORNER: 5 (Good) Ways to Make Your Kid Hate You
Author: Alden Wicker
Source

Someday, if it hasn’t already happened, you’ll hear those dreaded words from your kid–”Mom, I hate you!”

You might be cool when it happens. You might even bake your daughter a commemorative “I Hate You” cake. You might have to leave the room so you can go scream into a pillow. No matter how you think you might react, you’d better prepare yourself now, because if you’re a good parent, the big “I hate you!” moment tends to be a when, not an if.

That’s because there are several things you will do on your way to raising a smart, self-sufficient human being that, at the time, your kid won’t get. But one day, after all is said and done, your grown son or daughter will write an article for LearnVest that says, “I owe my financial habits to my mother, and I say that with pride.”

To help you in your effort to be “totally mean” and to embrace your “ruining” their lives, here are five things that you should do with your child that will make them hate you now … and totally thank you later.

1. Deny him candy at the checkout.

Ah, your child’s first impulse purchase: Reese’s. Nerds. Gummy worms. Whatever it is, when this comes up, he might not even be old enough to say “I hate you” yet, but his tantrum will make his point clear enough.

It may be hard to remember as you’re dragging him out the front door of the store while everyone stares, but as we’ve said before, impulsivity is a trait that research has definitively connected with a poor financial future. Every time you say, “that’s not how we’re spending our money,” to an impulse purchase, whether it’s candy when they’re young or sparkly jewelry when they’re teens, you’re teaching skills that will translate to being a smart shopper later on. (Here are more tips on combating impulsiveness in your child.)

2. Shoo her outside to play.

Your kid might be annoyed at having to leave the house to find entertainment, instead of stationing herself in front of the Playstation. But turning off the TV and dragging her outdoors for at least an hour a day has numerous benefits, including lowering the likelihood of ADHD, increasing performance on standardized tests, protecting her eyesight and lowering anxiety.

Plus, you’re teaching the creativity that comes with the ability to entertain oneself for free–a skill that she will highly value later on.

3. Have him do chores for spending money.

Instead of doling out the same amount of money every week for allowance, try paying your children extra for extra chores you need done around the house, like cleaning the gutters or clearing out the garage. Also encourage him to come to you with his own ideas on what he can do around the house, and how much he thinks it’s worth to you. You’ll be helping him build entrepreneurial and negotiation skills.

4. Make her take lessons, and don’t let her quit.

It’s totally unfair, but true for at least a handful of us here on the LearnVest editorial team: We regret our parents letting us quit our lessons. Moms editor Cheryl wishes her parents hadn’t let her quit violin. Senior editor Laura is mad her parents let her quit dance. In short, we each gave our parents hell for years, but we wish they had forced us to keep going.

This isn’t just because we wish we could jam out “Piano Man” at a party on a whim. Research shows that music lessons can increase children’s IQs, improve their memory and make children more sensitive to emotional cues in speech. Participating in sports can improve self confidence and–especially in girls–improve their body image. Kids who play sports also fare better in school and are less likely to smoke, do drugs or abuse alcohol in high school.

Plus, in this election season, we especially like that Michelle Obama makes her girls choose one activity and do one that she picks out for them–so they can learn to work hard at something they don’t necessarily enjoy.

If you’re looking for lessons and activities that fit your budget, use our guide. (We love Girl Scouts because it’s affordable and includes financial literacy activities.)

5. Let them flail … and fail.

We don’t recommend you check out completely–kids need your support. But at some point, be it when he hits calculus in high school, when he’s four states away in college or when he’s searching for his first job, you won’t be able to help him at all. So start letting him flail on small things now. Your kid might be supremely annoyed that you’ve declined to shell out $50 for diorama materials and instead made him get creative with what he could find in the craft box, or that you let the deadline go by for applying to join that elite sports team (when you clearly told him it was his responsibility), but you’re teaching him invaluable skills like creativity and the ability to get stuff done.

Research supports this view: One study showed that children who tried and failed to retrieve an answer before being told the correct response were more likely to remember the answer next time. Kids also perform better in school when they know that failure is part of learning. Try letting your child fail, but then brainstorming ways they can improve and succeed next time.

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LEARNING COMMON NEWS

Click here to see what’s happening in the Georges Vanier Learning Commons…

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CHRISTMAS CONCERT
Our Christmas Concert was a great success despite some minor “technical glitches”. Thank you to Mrs. Scheller and the whole of the Vanier staff for your hard work in preparing our students, and of course to our talented students for performing so well and confidently.

Both performances were videotaped and complimentary DVDs will be available early in January.

Thank you parents for your patience, support, and ticket donations. All proceeds will go towards special lighting (some of which you saw at the concert) which will be used for many years to come at concerts, assemblies, and special events.

Mrs. Scheller leads Georges Vanier students

Mrs. Scheller leads Georges Vanier students at our recent Christmas Concert

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AUTHENTIC LEARNING: Making Connections
We know that when student work on authentic learning tasks, they see purpose in what they are doing and are motivated to do their very best. At Vanier, we try hard to provide these opportunities and our students are responding. Mrs. Chohan’s class recently had the opportunity to participate in an activity called Mystery Skype. Students from different places in the world video-conference and take turns asking questions of each other, guessing where the other class is from. Students had a great time talking with students from Missouri. We look forward to using technology such as iPads, AppleTV, and projectors, to allow our students connect with students and experts elsewhere.

Students in Mrs. Chohan's Grade 4/5 class participate in a #mysteryskype session with students in Missouri

Students in Mrs. Chohan’s Grade 4/5 class participate in a #mysteryskype session with students in Missouri

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Mrs. Chohan passes around an iPad allowing students to answer questions asked by friends in Missouri.

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WHAT’S COMING UP?
January 7, 2013…Welcome back!
January 8 – PAC Meeting – 9 a.m. AND 6 p.m.
January 16 – Uzume Taiko fine arts performance – 10:45 a.m.
January 21 – Kindergarten Registration Begins
January 28 – Clothes on Wheels at Vanier
February 8 – Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
February 11 – Family Day Holiday – Classes not in session
March 18-28 – Spring Break – Classes not in session
March 29 – Good Friday – Classes not in session
April 1 – Easter Monday – Classes not in session

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Let it SNOW
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